Lake Arrowhead deli will stay closed for months after winter storm – San Bernardino Sun


It will likely be months before Lake Arrowhead residents will be able to enjoy another meal at Lake Arrowhead Village Pizza, Deli & Arcade.

The lakeside pizzeria — believed to be the oldest restaurant in Lake Arrowhead — is another victim of the winter storms that battered the San Bernardino Mountains earlier this month.

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“We were closed for about eight days throughout the storm,” co-owner Sean Doyle said. “We were super-excited to reopen. We were feeding the firemen, we were doing donations to the Red Cross and with the church to the high school.”

But at lunch time the next day, they noticed the roof was bowing.

“I told everyone in the restaurant to get out, just to be safe,” Doyle said.

Lake Arrowhead Village Pizza, Deli & Arcade is closed after recent storms caused structural damage to the property. On Tuesday, March 28, 2023, a notice was visible on the door and tape surrounded the building. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

The owners and their contractors discovered the main support beam for the restaurant’s roof appeared to be splitting.

“It’s an old restaurant,” Doyle said. “They said it was a mix of the years, weather and weight and as soon as that big storm hit, we had about 8 feet of snow on it … That was the last straw.”

After the fire department failed to put in a truss to reinforce the roof, the deli was red-tagged by San Bernardino County and declared unsafe for human habitation until it’s repaired.

“From the outside looking in, it looks completely fine,” Doyle said. “But when you see the beam, you go ‘Oh, that is not good.’”

Initial estimates are that the restaurant will be closed “anywhere from two months to five months,” Doyle said, which will leave the restaurant with a mortgage, bills to pay and 25 employees out of work. The restaurant’s walk-in refrigerator has been cleared, with all the food donated to a local church’s food pantry.

“We’ll be OK,” Doyle said. “We’ve dealt with some hard stuff the last few years with COVID.”

In the meantime, he’s been home, watching the World Baseball Classic, shoveling snow and going snowboarding with his son.

“Everyone knows each other out here, so if someone needs help, someone’s here to help you,” Doyle said. “That’s the light at the end of the tunnel: We know we’ll be OK.”



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